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   Fiore at the Gardens Board of Directors

The condo association's board of directors at Fiore at the Gardens is a government in miniature. The board members are elected by the condo owners to run the association and manage condominium property. Condo owners rely on the board to resolve community problems ranging from building damage to unruly residents

Fiore HOA Board of Directors meet regularly @ 6:00 PM in the Clubhouse. All condo owners are welcome to participate. 

President: George Sterlacci   

Vice President: William Bracken

Treasurer: Cindy Coons 

Secretary: Cindy Coons

Director: Trevor Frobose 

Director: John Juhasz

561.776.6262

561.776.6262

561.776.6262

561.776.6262

561.776.6262

561.776.6262

Refers to the rules of parliamentary law as it is followed in any given assembly or organization along with any rules of order the body may have adopted. Parliamentary Procedure for Better Meetings -- Happier Members

   Rules and Covenants

The first priority for a condo board of directors is to carry out its duties in accordance with state law and the governing documents of the condo associations. The directors are also responsible for enforcing the covenants-the rules for residents-and doing so uniformly and fairly, including obeying the same rules themselves. That responsibility requires the directors to review complaints, decide if the covenants or rules have been violated, and impose fines on owners who have broken the rules. IF it becomes necessary to change or revise the rules, that's also the board's responsibility. Beyond the requirements specifically written into the law and the governing documents, directors are obligated to act in their official capacity in the best interests of the associations. 

   Maintenance

Condo owners handle repairs on their own units, but it's the board's job to fix problems with the common areas-the buildings exterior, the hallways and amenities such as a pool; cabana or volleyball court. The board must arrange for regular inspections and maintenance and, if multiple repairs are necessary, the directors must set priorities for which problem needs fixing first. In some cases, the board may put projects out to bid, in which case the directors must review the bids and pick the best one. Fiore at the Gardens association hired First Service Management Company, to deal with such issues, but the ultimate legal responsibility goes back to the board. 

   Finance

It's up to the board of directors to handle the condo association’s money. Every member of an association is assessed a fee which funds association operations, such as repairs and administration. It's the director's job, to review the next year's budget and set the annual fees to pay for services while maintaining a reserve for emergencies. The directors must take action against owners who don' pay, if an owner continues to refuse, the directors have an obligation to the other association members to take Legal action. 

   Why meeting minutes are important

Board meeting minutes and other reports are available to all homeowners thru the property managers office

You shouldn't be intimidated by the term "minutes" since it's actually a little misleading. After all, the Board doesn't want or need a record of its meeting proceedings minute by minute! But it is important to capture the essence of the meeting, including details such as

  • Decisions made (motions made, votes, etc.)

  • next steps planned

  • identification and tracking of action items

Minutes are a tangible record of the meeting for its participants and a source of information for members and owner who were unable to attend. In some cases, meeting minutes can act as a reference point, for example:

  • When a meeting's outcomes impact other collaborative activites or projects within the association

  • Minutes can serve to notify (or remind) individuals of tasks assigned to them and/or timelines